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Girls, Episode Four Recap

Girls, Episode Four Recap

“True or false? When @JuddApatow and I were writing tonight’s @girlsHBO we both cried.” — Lena Dunham on Twitter

I’m guessing “false” to the above.  Unless she realized how the ending would come across to viewers.

Hannah scurries into her publisher’s office for a meeting with her editor, David (whom we last saw at Hannah’s birthday party, throwing Ray into a table). The receptionist tells her he’s not in yet. “Oh good I thought I was late.”  “You are. He’s just not in yet.” Hannah takes a seat to wait. There is a flurry of activity. Something is going on.

Hannah: “Excuse me — I jut wanted to know if it’s safe to be on this floor of the building.”

Another employee walks in and the receptionist tells her,  “David is dead.”

Cut to Marnie running, doing pull-ups at a public park, and shadow boxing. Later, we see her making a smoothie and listening to self-help recordings. The not-so-subtle point is that she is lost and her life is empty.

Hannah tells Jessa about David’s death and she says Hannah, it happens. Like jury duty. Hannah says when she dies she hopes she doesn’t see it coming. Jessa tells her time isn’t linear. So really, we have already died. And yet, we have not yet been born.

Adam bursts in, and Hannah tells him her editor is dead. Adam is immediately sympathetic – until Hannah says, “And no one even began to tell me what is next for my e-book!” He can’t believe she’s thinking about her book.

Adam: “Are you feeling anything beyond wondering when your book is going to hit the stands?”

Hannah: “It’s an e-book, Adam. There are no stands, and you know that.”

Later, Adam finds Hannah on her computer, and she reads aloud from Gawker that David was found face down in the Hudson River. He’s incredulous that she’s getting her news from Gawker. She says they report on media, and she’s a “media-ist.”

Adam: “How would you feel when you die if a bunch of judgmental creeps, celibate against their will, snarkily reported about every detail of your body decomposing.” She says that’s not what’s happening here. They argue about the merits or non merits of Gawker, Jezebel, and comment boards. “Why are we fighting about this?” she asks. Adam responds, “Why aren’t you mourning quietly?”

Shosh is pondering her extensive bandana collection. Jessa asks her if she ever had a friend who died. Jessa recalls her favorite friend, Season, who died from choking on her own vomit. Shosh suggests she visit her dead friend’s mom or visit her grave and bring flowers.

Hannah and Adam are in bed. She climbs out and starts getting dressed. He asks her where she’s going. She tells him she’s going to go work an extra shift at Ray’s – clearly, it’s too soon to quit her day job (referring to the up-in-the-air status of her e-book). Adam groans. “What?” she says. “Still too soon for you?” Adam asks how she’d react if he died aside from worrying about making the rent. She said she’d be extremely sad — and yes, she’d worry about making the rent. “Extremely sad?” he says He tells her that if she died “The world would blur. I wouldn’t know what a tree was.”

At the coffee shop, Hannah tells Ray her editor is dead. Ray is stunned. “How do you feel? Do you want to go home?” She says she feels nothing. But yeah, she would love to go home.

Ray: Why don’t you place just one crumb of basic  human compassion on this fat free muffin of sociopathic detachment. See how that tastes.”

Jessa calls the mom of her dead friend Season. Says she wants to visit her grave. We don’t hear what’s being said on the other end of the line, but Jessa’s reaction is shock and outrage. All she says is, “What? What?”

Hannah walks into her building to find Laird. Tells him she lost a close friend yesterday. He hugs her. She says she really doesn’t care. Caroline comes down the stairs and invites them both out to get tea. Outside, Hannah says she doesn’t want to “feel like a monster” for caring about what happens about her work. Caroline says she’s surprised she’s not asking her more about Adam and his childhood and about all his old lovers. Hannah says “Oh, so now you’re going to call me self-involved, too?”

Jessa shows up at a brownstone. A young woman holding a baby is standing there. It’s her friend — who apparently faked her death just to get away from her. She tells Jess that look, she was a drug addict and Jessa was an enabler. Season’s adorable, hipster husband shows up.” Jessa, angry, hurt, probably embarrassed, says,  “Don’t call me when your life’s in shambles.” And she storms out.

Marnie is at the coffee shop and finds Ray and his boss, Hermie, laughing at her humiliating music video. They tease her. She goes off on them and Ray says “Do you even want to work here any more?” and she says “Of course I don’t want to work here! This place *$#% sucks. No one wants to work here.” She quits.

Back in crazy town, Hannah, Laird, and Caroline are running around a cemetery. They sit in the grass and Hannah says she is afraid Adam is going to figure out her lack of depth –because no one can rival his depth of emotion. Caroline tells Hannah an outrageously sad story about their 12 year old cousin who died of MS and how Adam granted her last wish and took her to a prom. Laird bursts into tears. Hannah is stone-faced.  Caroline says she made it up and Hannah didn’t even shed a tear. “What is wrong with you?” Caroline asks, laughing hysterically.  At this point, I’m wondering the same thing.

In the end, Hannah returns home to find Adam is sitting outside on the apartment steps. There is tension between them.  She tells him she reacted the way she did because she was just shocked about how random life can be.

Hannah: “One day you can just be walking around, talking, using your gay phone app. And the next you are face down in the river with no explanation. It always takes me a while to process my emotions.”  She starts crying and says she liked David and it’s hard to know that her champion is gone. Then tells him the story of her friend, “ Margaret” who died. And it’s the same exact story Caroline told in the cemetery!

So the take-away from this episode is that Hannah is a pathological narcissist?

Not exactly making me want to come back for more.

Logan Belle Logan Belle is the author of eight novels, including Now or Never, Miss Chatterley, and The Librarian. For updates and obsessions, follow @jamieLbrenner www.loganbelle.com