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GODZILLA—A Surprising Love Story



When I was a little girl, I watched old-school Godzilla on Ted Turner’s Supersation 17 (or TBS for you real old-timers) in Atlanta, Georgia. I might have just dated myself. Let’s keep that between us, yeah?

I remember Godzilla being this big, scary dinosaur/sea/who-knows-what-it-is monster and of course I remember people scattering like ants when he roared. I remember the epic battles with Mothra, Ghidora and King Kong. Death, mass destruction, mayhem—Godzilla was one of the original death-bringers. So when my three teen girls asked me to take them to see the new Godzilla, I was skeptical. I expected more death, mass destruction and mayhem only this time (SPOILER ALERT PEOPLE) Godzilla was a good monster, full of love and caring for the human race—look, I could be stretching that a bit, but bear with me.

Bottom line?

This monster gave me the feel-goods. He cared about humans, and in spite of being shot, bombed and blatantly hated and maligned by every military on the planet, he continued to try to protect and save the sorry lot of us.

Like I said—feel good.

So anyway, I’m sitting in the theatre and my mind is being blown by this new and improved epic monster who’s had a change of heart and is now fighting to save mankind. Then I get smacked upside the head with a love story.

Yes, I said LOVE STORY.
Lea Griffith
Interwoven into the brand new death, mass destruction and mayhem is a story about a male Mothra trying to get to his female Mothra. They only wanna have some fun (probably kinky fun because hey, they’re MOTHRA monsters) and populate the earth with little Mothra offspring. But then there’s big, bad Godzilla, keeping the love train from coming into the station. It’s important to note here that there are no gratuitous sex scenes between the Mothra, thank the good Lord in Heaven, but the emotion is there—you can feel their desperate desire to be together. It literally jumps off the screen. You say species propagation, I say LOVE. (It was love and you can’t tell me any different.)

I’ll admit, I’m a Happily Ever After kinda gal. I was rooting for the Mothra to find their forever. I think love should always win out and perhaps, even though the Mothra were absolutely destroyed by Godzilla’s blue mouth fire, they realized their story was a Romeo and Juliet from the beginning. They knew love for the limited time they were on Earth and realized it was never going to work because hello…GODZILLA, but they tried.

For love to work, there’s has to be an effort by both parties—love ain’t all kinky Mothra fun and baby Mothra-making—but for me, they were the definition of love. The struggle to get together and stay together, or in their case, stay alive so they could be together caught my attention and made my heart clutch.

So to wrap it all up in a nice bow, Godzilla loves humans now and still hates Mothra. Mothras hate Godzilla and humans but love each other and want to make Mothra babies. Godzilla destroys Mothra because of his overwhelming love for humans and there is no Mothra HEA. I give it a 4 out of 5 hearts because I went in expecting death, mass destruction and mayhem, and I got it, but I also got a dose of love Mothra-style.

If you want a happily-ever-after minus Mothra but with enough kink to yank your Mothra chain, check out my new release, TOO MUCH. It’s about the struggle to come back together and get things right this go ‘round. I promise Jeremiah and Daly are nothing like Mothra, but they’ll fight just as hard to keep a love they should have never let go.

Lea Griffith Lea Griffith began sneaking her mother’s romance novels at a very young age, cutting her teeth on the greats: McNaught, Woodiwiss, Garwood. As she got older, her need to devour all genres of romance–including contemporary, paranormal, and sci-fi—grew. Now, when she’s not working her day job, you can usually find her at her keyboard, using every spare second to write. She lives with her husband and three teenage daughters in rural Georgia.
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